Tag Archives: mary rose

Mary Rose Museum – Update 2016

DHA Designs have now updated the lighting for the Mary Rose Museum.

On completion of the conservation process for the hull, the “Hotbox” enclosure was removed allowing full, panoramic views of the ship remains.

The hull lighting was re-designed (and updated to all LED) giving a set of dramatic “looks” that (very) slowly dissolve, as well as a set of a/v presentations that project imMary Rose news imageages into and around the hull.

This phase of the museum design was by REAL Studios, a/v by Graham English, sound by Peter Key and lighting equipment and control by Control Lighting and Enliten.

 

Photography: Hufton+Crow

 

Mary Rose Museum shortlisted for Museum of the Year 2014

The Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth has been shortlisted for the Art Fund Prize for Museum of the Year 2014, along with five other museums. The judges will announce the winner at the awards ceremony on 09 July in London. DHA Designs designed the lighting for the museum, winning the Public Building category of this years Lighting Design Awards.

 

Mary Rose Museum wins Civic Trust Award & Michael Middleton Special Award

We are delighted to hear that the new Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth’s Historic Dockyard, lit by DHA Designs, has won both the Civic Trust Award and the Michael Middleton Special Award.

Mary Rose Museum

 

This prestigious award is a memorial and tribute to Michael Middleton CBE, who established the Civic Trust Awards in 1959 and is awarded to a restoration project or new build within a conservation area.

Congratulations to the architects Wilkinson Eyre Architects and Pringle Brandon Perkins + Wills, together with the team at the Mary Rose Trust.

Mary Rose Museum opens

The Mary Rose Museum opens to the public this week. The lighting for the gallery spaces, the exhibitions, show cases and the hull was designed by DHA Designs.

Located in the historic dockyard of Portsmouth, the Mary Rose Museum displays part of the ship that served the navy of King Henry VIII for 33 years before spending 437 years undiscovered at the bottom of the sea. The remains of the ship were raised from the seabed in 1982, and along with the thousands of artefacts recovered, it proudly sits within the heart of the new museum building designed by Wilkinson Eyre Architects.

Watch the BBC news footage here.